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's not without the controversy, but the budget cuts that are from educators to parents about the morality of corporate advertising in schools is certainly causing a stir. yet, filling the financial shortfall is the biggest prem fa prem-- problem facing schools today. and he needs funding. >> american public education is in financial crisis. >> he heads up education funding partners, a colorado firm that matches it with schools looking for cash. >> they want the right partners and the right controls, our model gives them that control. >> over the years more schools have been turning to corporate sponsors for much needed revenue. they struck a deal with staples in exchange for ads on the district's website and a supply list containing a coupon and kids got to attend the science enrichment program. >> it's really about selling anything, it's about allowing companies to come in and partner for a good cause and public education in responsible ways. >> there are aggressive campaigns out there buses and playing fields becoming common. for some districts it's what keep the doors open. critics arg
. some join right out of high school with the promise that they can further their education while in the military. this helps not only our troops but an educated military helps america. now the administration has broken another promise. thousands of troops can no longer go to college because the education program has been scuttled. for the sake of politics, the chicken little administration has handpicked programs to cut that would make americans feel the sequester the most. one of those programs is the military tuition assistance program. mr. speaker, tuition assistance for our military is not much money. the pentagon, the department of defense, has a budget of $700 billion. this little program is .1% of e $700 billion department of defense program. the tuition assistance program is great because it's one of the ways our government can take care of our men and women who help us. it's allowed members of the military to take 870,000 courses and graduate 50,000 individuals from many degrees. that is remarkable. but the program is gone thus sayeth the white house. the over the past f
that the economic philosophy of republicans has caused a massive amount of wealth for everyone. and education is ripe if reform and republican principles are perfect for minority voters. >> should i let you weigh in? >> i'm sorry. >> why are you laughing? >> you're laughing at education. expound upon your laughter on education. >> well, because its s's ridicus to try to think that the party who tried to get rid of the department of education is the one who wants to push education. it's ridiculous to think the tent that wanted to gut the teachers union want to push education. the party that wanted to take funding away from education is now the party in favor of education. that's reason i started laughing. >> those policieses worked well for you over the last 40 years. those schools that you're professing that teachers unions have a hold on on are doing really well. where school choice and charter schools that's what's doing well and voters across minority voters to voters of every ethnicity tick have seen the benefits of those kind of schools. >> by this argument, we can see how difficult the
to the senate floor. gregg? >> growing concerns over higher education in the united states as new numbers suggest the level of student loan debt is reaching crisis proportions. according to the federal reserve bank of new york, americans now hold a total of nearly a trillion dollars in student loan debt, as an average of $23,000 per person and that could take an advantage person roughly tn years to pay off, maybe more. joining us now the reverend jesse jackson, founder and president of the rainbow push coalition. i know you're deeply concerned about this, in part because i read your recent column on the problem. how do we solve it. >> well, it's more about a trillion dollars, more than credit card debt, so many youth who have able minds will not apply and those in school cannot stay in. and in black colleges about 15,000 fewer this year and some, the money without necessarily the grade. and some grades can't because of the money and that undermines our future capacity to compete. >> gregg: part of the problem is that the price of a four-year college education has really skyrocketed. i loo
of education creating and filling a new job and pays six figures. and washington correspondent byron york joins us and the reason is, this is probably after the sequestration. >> it is, it's the white house initiative on educational excellence for african-americans, it was created by executive order. >> greta: the president did it. >> he created it himself, by the president last year. it was placed in the education department, pay is about $124,000 a year and it's just been filled. >> greta: after march 1st? >> after march 1st and sequestration takes effect. what you have when you have the czars or coordinators or whatever you want to call them, it's an admission that the federal government has a lot of programs that are spending a lot of money that aren't well-coordinated and aren't working together well and the president feels he needs to appoint somebody to do that. right there it's kind of an admission the whole system is a little bloated. >> greta: after everything else is cut march 1st and when he created by executive order we knew sequestration was likely to happen within six or seven mo
the crac, has not been educate along the way. i think an organization like the national endowment for financial education is a great resource to start from. i don't believe that wall street is always the best place to get educated. so there's a start, a place to start a plan. melissa: yeah. >> next thing have someone hold you accountable. meet with somebody. i like pat's idea, find a financial buddy. we often work out with a buddy to help us out. find a financial advisor and somebody you can work with. melissa: that makes sense. you say saving 15 to 20% of your annual income. i wonder at what price? saving aside 20% of the your income, does that mean you don't buy a house, you rent instead? would you set aside the income and use credit cards and rack up debt so you can save? at what price, how seriouous is it to save that much money. >> how serious is that individual, that's the question. because let's put this in reference. this individual that in our scenario, sob who is 50 to 60 years old or so, they're really at the peak of their financial succs. they're making the most they e
health professionals to parents and educators, in an effort named at preventing more tragedies like this. >> jon: the president there reacting to the tragedy at sandy hook elementary school. one key item in his plan, the ban on assault weapons. that ended this week after harry reid dropped the ban from any legislation. so, jim, you didn't get a lot of coverage on that in the media. >> well, on cnn on thursday, you got a certain amount of oh, hand wringing, it's so terrible. the end of everything in terms of this issue. and you're struck by the contrast that news thursday was covered and the flip for the president in last year. talks about mental health parents, educators and the pl panoply of things you might do. and so adam lanza the killer there, and sort of fallen out of the picture and the things have become gone control. the at media is so focused, john holmes, right about a the lot of things, converted to islam, and in terms of what was going on with him. the only thing they want, define as justice for newtown is gun control up or down. >> jon: we'll get to you in a second, judy. r
and to get an education and get a good job, to worship got in their own way, to get married, to raise a family. the same is true of those young palestinians i met with this morning. the same is true for young palestinians who yearn for a better life in gaza. that's where peace begins. not just in the plans of leaders but in the hearts of people. not just in some carefully designed process, but in the daily connections, that sense of empathy that takes place among those who live together in this land and in this sacred city of jerusalem. and let me say this as a politician. i can promise you this. political leaders will never take risks if the people do not push them to take some risks. you must create the change that you want to see. ordinary people can accomplish extraordinary things. i know this is possible. look to the bridges being built in business in civil society by some of you here today. look at the young people who have not yet learned a reason to mistrust or those young people who have learned to overcome a legacy of mistrust that they inherited from their parents. because
the value of education and have produced 10 nobel laureates. [applause] israelis understand the power of invention and universities educate engineers. economicit has led to growth and progress. solar power, electric cars, synthetic limbs, stem cell research that treat disease. computer technologies that change the way people around the world live. if people want to see the world of the future economy, they should look at tel aviv, home of research centers and startups. [applause] israelis are active on social media. every day seems to be a different facebook campaign on where i should give a speech. [laughter] [applause] that innovation is as important to the relationship between the united states and israel for security. our first free trade agreement in the world was reached with israel, nearly three decades ago. today the trade between our two countries is at $40 billion every year. [applause] more importantly, that partnership has created new products and medical treatments and pushing new frontiers of science and exploration. that is the kind of relationship israel should have an
to see better educated, but you understand that an effective member has to negotiate and has to compromise to come to some sort of final product. otherwise you will never get a final product. >> i agree with -- what is the biggest problem we face today that we are just stop gone? it is this fiscal crisis, the budget. families are looking at it and saying i have got to deal with this all the time, and you guys cannot deal with it. the biggest thing to me would be the leadership of congress to recognize that the budget aocess has to be utilized in way that gets this issue resolved, because if we go every three months with more in decision and 11th-hour -- making, thetizen frustration that people have to live their lives and cannot figure out the process, it will drive them nuts and treat the most negative phillies in the world. it is the responsibility of leadership to make this process work, and they have to act like leaders, like tom daschle did and some of the other folks. >> changing the rules might take the incentive structure, but ultimately is about the men and women who
education, because i feel that if we educate ourselves, the more we educate ourselves, that we can overcome poverty. and the fact that if we do it as a community, and we stick together, we bond together, we support one another, with education, with health, then we can start to fix some of the issues at the root of the cause. and so we can erase, we can erase families who are struggling to get by on minimum wage. we can erase the drug abuse that we see on the streets and in the home. we can erase the gun violence and the domestic violence, and we can start to bring attention to mental illness. but this can only be done if everyone in the community is invested. so i think it has to be a position that we all take in which we say, yeah, take better care of yourself, yeah, go for your prescreening to make sure that you don't have any ailment that can be detrimental to you down the road. we also can then turn to our youth and our adults and say, "it's okay to get educated on these matters, it's okay to do well in school, for the young person that's in school. it's okay to achieve and be academica
for a fun and educational experience. since 1938 the derby has inspired thousands of the region's young people to learn the physics behind gravity racing and the engineering used to design soapbox racers. america's soapbox derby has been called the greatest amateur racing event in the world. and on june 15 it will continue to make history. the derby teaches sportsmanship, hard work and pride of accomplishment and it imbues its young participants with that same spirit of innovation that has long fueled america's greatness. young people who participate in these derbies are often sponsored by community groups, police departments, fire departments and others who want to invest in our country's future and a very direct and meaningful way -- in a very direct and meaningful way. every year i am incredibly proud of my constituents from maryland's fifth district who participate. a number of soapbox derby champions have come from the fifth district, including the 2009 s of the 2007, 2008, and last year. the winners in 2007 and 2008, kasey rader and courtney rail, respectively went on to win the
that relates to energy, about investing in education so we are competitive and number-one, to build and strengthen and sustained at have commitment to our seniors, whether their economic or their health security. in contrast to the ryan bill, which cuts almost $100 billion from $98 billion, from pell grants. $100 billion from pell grants --pet and crack grants grants. and is a job loser in the short and long term. the contrast could not have been different. one, a statement of our values, that is in support of the middle class, the backbone of our democracy, again, honoring the bows of left-handers, the other, a job loser, and ends the medicare guarantee, and makes it more difficult for young people to afford a college education. in,hat is the week we are and now our members will be taking that message home about the contrast in budget desert -- theout observance of the third-year anniversary of the affordable care act and what that means in the lives of american working families and a celebration of the fact that we have a new inspirational leader in rome. mention theot underfundin
were widely denied an education. now, more than eight million students attend afghan schools and more than 40% of them are female. in 2001 afghanistan had 20,000 teachers, all male. today there are 200,000 teachers including 60,000 women. the number of schools in afghanistan has grown from 3400 in 2001 to more than 16,000 today. per capita gdp has grown fourfold since 2001. afghan life expectancy has increased 20 years since then. more than 18 million afghans now have telephone access compared to about one million ten years ago. now these facts do not eliminate the difficulties that we face. they continue insurgency, a neighbor, pakistan that remains a safe haven for insurgents moving across the border. an ineffective and often corrupt central government and other major barriers to stability and to progress. just as it is important for us to be realistic about the challenges that we face in afghanistan, it's also important that we recognize the advances that have an bp made. so that we can reinforce actions that promote success. i just mentioned two here. the first is to continue to w
, in science and research, in education. things that are important to power the economy. our focus has been on jobs first. let's get the economy in full gear. not put the brakes on it. which is what the republicans do. they've gotten austerity budget that according to the nonpartisan congressional budget office, will result in 750,000 fewer jobs bn i end of the year. so we say let's tackle the deficit in a smart way, get people back to work and reduce it over a steady period over a period of time and our comes to balance at the same time that the republicans' budget from last year comes into balance. >> on the issue of revenue, i believe your budget has about $200 billion more in revenue than senator murray's budget in the senate. why did you put that in there considering that republicans are so adverse to any new revenue? >> the budget we have in our democratic proposal. if you take it even together with the revenue from the fiscal cliff agreement, is still less total revenue, luke, than was embedded in the bipartisan simpson-bowles agreement. so we have less revenue proposed by that bipar
here want. they want the ability to make their own decisions and to get an education and to get a good job, to worship god in their own way. to get married, to raise a family. the same is true of those young palestinians i met with this morning. the same is true for the young palestinians who yearn for a better life in gaza. that's where peace begins. not just in the plans of leaders, but in the hearts of people. not just in some carefully designed process, but in the daily connections, that sense of empathy that takes place among those who live together in this land and in this sacred city of jerusalem. and let me say this as a politician. i can promise you this. political leaders will never take risks if the people do not push them to take some risks. you must create the change that you want to see. ordinary people can accomplish extraordinary things. i know this is possible. look to the bridges being built in businesses in civil society by some of you here today. look at the young people who have not yet learned a reason to mistrust. or those young people who have learned to overcom
. it would be an enormous gift to mcconnell. >> sean: a gift. >> really, okay, let me educate you about a recent poll. because clearly you don't-- >> tamara is it possible for he you to educate me? >> i know, you know it all. opponents two-one. he's like a crypt keeper, he won't go away. >> sean: like the former klansman who used to head up your party from west virginia. >> you, two, mcconnell isn't doing anything. nobody likes him. whether you like ashley judd, or not. -- >> tamara, tamara, i will bet any amount of money if ashley judd runs against mitch mcconnell in kentucky, she will not be a senator from the state of kentucky-- tennessee, i'm sorry. >> and left leaning, a left leaning pollster currently has mcconnell leading all. and a left-leaning pollster. >> because she's incredibly polarizing. some of the things she said, it was unconscionable to breed. >> sean: unconscionable to breed. >> because there are so many starving children. and has a problem with a father giving away a daughter at the wedding. >> sean: keep going. >> a problem with christianity because it legitimizes m
to urge them to tell the public -- our job is to educate. it's the public's job to decide when they look on the grocery shelf or have the lever on a soda machine which thing to take, which product is in their interest. all we're trying to do is educate and then hopefully if they understand they would be better off with one product or another, they'll make the intelligent choice. >> you could do ads for education as the executive of new york city, you are telling people what they can and cannot do. why is that government's job to do that? >> we're not telling them at all. we're telling them what science says is or isn't in their interest. we allow you to smoke. we just don't let you smoke where other people have to breathe the smoke that you -- that you're exhaling or comes from your cigarette. the same thing with obesity which incidentally is a public interest because we're going to spend $5 billion on treating people of 0 obesity in our hospitals in new york city alone this year. but regardless -- >> where is the line? where is it too far for government to go? >> i do not think we shoul
think would probably help the city a lot more focusing on education and focusing in terms of economic development. you know, i just have to say -- >> of course his argument is this is critical of a critical public health issue and people who smoke cost millions if not billions of dollars a year. >> but again, sort of return on the time you're going to spend. given the fact that it's not like it is going to stop people from buying vigts. i mean, they can still walk in and purchase them. i just think it is an interesting use of his time and i have to say that i think the city would be better served if he focused on education as opposed to this. >> doug, the head of the new york association of convenience stores is not happy about this. here's what he had to say about it. we think it's patently absurd. can you think of any other retail business licensed to sell legal products that is required to hide them from the view of its customers? he right? >> well, i think that's because the tobacco industry spends about a billion dollars in direct marketing toward -- they make payments to these c
grandson, henry adams, remembered louisa catherine fondly. in his works, the education of the adams, he described louisa catherine and her role in this house and relationship with the family. he felt that she was the odd man out, because she was born in england and educated in france. she remained a foreign personality to many of the adams's. he recollects her sitting in her paneled room, using her silver tea pot that that she brought with her from her home in england to the old house. she would entertain both herself and many guest in this room. john quincy adams and louisa would inherit this home from john adams. i thought about selling it, but then decided that it was important to the family story to hold onto the house for future generations. >> you can visit there today. >> yes. >> wonderful. where the papers? >> they are at the massachusetts historical society in boston. they used to be at the old house would distill my very, but they were transferred to the historical society for safekeeping. >> a question on facebook from genie webber. i have read excerpts from her autobiography
to make their own decisions and to get an education, and to get a good job, to worship god in their own way, to get married, to raise a family, the same is true of those young palestinians that i met with this morning. the same is true for young palestinians who yearn for a better life in gaza, that's where peace begins, not just in the plans of leaders but in the hearts of people. not just in some carefully designed process but in the daily connections that sense of empathy that takes place among those who live together in this land, and in this sacred city of jerusalem. [applause] >> and let me say this as a politician, i can promise you this. political leaders will never take risks if the people do not push them to take some risks. you must create the change that you want to see. [applause] >> ordinary people can accomplish extraordinary things. i know this is possible. look to the bridges being built in business in civil society by some of you here today. look at the young people who have not yet learned a reason to mistrust. or those young people who have learned to overcome a lega
the polarized the geological lead as we bring to bear. what did we achieve in education or environmentalism or what's not and in that sense, mayors suggests their accessibility to us but ultimately the real question is army is not in vulnerable to influence? our mayors on the side of big money or not? as compared to what? what in the world system? my view is mayors and councilors and citizens of cities are a great place to start because cds around world remain more cosmopolitan and open and tolerant and floral and more creative than the alternative entities at the state and national level. why not make a bet on them? we bet on the nation's state for 400 years and i am not sure in the 20 first century that that is paying off? lana please democratic that on the city for a while lands see what they can do? is worth making that bet. >> turn it over to the audience. listen. i said that when i had the opportunity. when it is on the ballot by a vote for the parliament of mayors. i went on to say some of the things that could not accomplish, would not accomplish, some of the terrible obstacles the
and innovation that relates to energy. it's about investing in education so that we are competitive and number one to build that, strengthens and sustains our commitment to our seniors, whether it's their economic or their health security. in contrast to the ryan bill, billion, almost $100 $the 8 billion from pell grants, $100 billion from pell grants, and in the decade ends the is a job uarantee loser in the short-term and even more so in the long-term. so the contrast could not have been different. one, a statement of our values to support of the middle class, which is the backbone of our democracy. again honoring the vows of our founders. the other a job loser ends the medicare guarantee and makes it more difficult for young people to afford a college education. be - now our members will taking that message home about the contrast in budget priorities about the observance of the third year anniversary of health care, affordable care act, and what that means in the lives of america's working families. and in celebration of the fact that we have a new inspirational leader until rome, pope f
. >> solman: a blogger for the chronicle of higher education, potter has argued that older scholars are clogging the pipeline for the younger ones. the number of ph.d's now far outstrips the number of tenured job openings. >> there's a lot of rage out there about being trained for jobs that you can never have. is it worth keeping younger people out, not giving them the chance to have full-time work, to develop themselves, so that older people can hang on to keep everything we love? >> solman: and these days, even younger people aren't always spring chickens. it's been seven years since 38- year-old joe fruscione earned his ph.d in english from george washington university. he has yet to land a full-time job. >> the market for ph.d's in humanities is almost super- saturated. there have been some positions where i've had to compete with hundreds of applicants who all on paper have roughly the same education and skill sets. >> so fruscione works three part-time gigs. one is running a moby dick discussion group at a washington, d.c. bookstore. >> when you hear moby dick, you think... >>
was a very educational show. we found out phish is starting a new album tomorrow. that's breaking news. and i got to look at my friend james bennett without a beard and i've got to say -- >> no, don't. >> he looks younger. he looks younger. don't you think? >> it's usually what he says. >> he looks younger. >> so i was asking you what made adam so great, editor of "new york" magazine. >> my boss, my friend and i think arguably the greatest magazine maker of this moment, of the last decade or so. >> he knows how to give a magazine a voice. very important. >> and visually. >> we had a lot of "new york" magazine people on today. >> and what a great cover story. >> knocking it out of the park. >> if it's way too early, what time is it, mike? >> well, it's time for "morning joe." but right now it's time for our ole pal crystal izz acht. >> i need a fix. ♪ i'm going down." >>> president obama's middle east tour treks on just hours after militants fire rockets out of gaza. >>> big moves back in washington as paul ryan's budget gets said for a vote in the house and vice president joe biden says the
for an interim government they hope will be formed within a month. >> the u.s.-educated i.t. executive was chosen by a majority of national coalition members in istanbul. in his first speech, he ruled out dialogue with the shock assad's regime. government troops and rebel fighters are blaming each other for a chemical attack near the northern city of aleppo -- dialogue with bashar alabama assad's regime. >> they accuse rebel fighters of launching a missile containing poisonous gases. the information minister said this type of weapon was prohibited under international law. >> so far, we have 16 martyrs and 86 wounded. most of them are in critical condition. the chemical contained in the missile causes immediate fainting, convulsion, and that. >> in istanbul, syria's main opposition group said they were looking at the attack rejected allegations that rebels were involved. we also know the rebels do not have access to chemical weapons. they would not have access to the means of launching these kind of chemical weapons. >> we have no details yet. we are against using chemical weapons from any side. i
was this tarp -- discharged from hospital to start to rebuild her life. part of the process is education. the headmistress of her new school says everyone will try to make her time there as enjoyable as possible. >> she herself once to be a normal teenage girl and to have the support of other girls around her. i think talking to her, it is something she very much missed during the time in the hospital, contact with her peer group. we aim that once she is in school, she will be a normal girl. >> although she knows the taliban has threatened to kill her if she ever returns to pakistan, she says she is determined to continue speaking about human-rights there. but for now, at least, she is looking forward to maki
find something pretty big in the department of education. we'll tell what you is up there. >>> a manhunt is underway after a prison director is gunned down in cold blood in his own home. ♪ [ slap! ] [ slap! slap! slap! slap! ] ow! ow! [ male announcer ] your favorite foods fighting you? fight back fast with tums. calcium-rich tums starts working so fast you'll forget you had heartburn. ♪ tum tum tum tum tums martha: this is a possible big setback for gun control advocates. senate majority leader harry reid says that he is dropping the assault weapons ban part of this which is really what we've been talking about all along. dropping that from the senate's gun control package. i'm joined by senator scott brown who is not at all surprised by this action. the former u.s. senator and fox news contributor joins us now. senator, good to have you with us to america's newsroom. >> thank you very much. martha: a lot of people talked about the big talk on sought weapons ban and it was so important to be passed. now it is not in the bill and been deleted. >> he is particular harry
. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. and contributions in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - hi, neighbor! today is thank you day! we say thank you to everyone we love! so thank you for coming over today! happy thank you dayyyyy! thank you day! thank you day! it's thank you day! grr!
, spearheading nutrition education, keeping kids active. >> when we come together, we make so much progress than just one person trying to do it alone. >> reporter: winning by losing in unison. ron mott, nbc news, oklahoma city. >>> that's "nbc nightly news" for this sunday. brian williams will be here tomorrow. i'm lester holt. i hope you'll join me shortly for "dateline." in the meantime, for all of us for "dateline." in the meantime, for all of us here at nbc news, goodnight. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> nbc bay area news starts now. >>> good evening. >> we're following developing news tonight where a man may have been swept out to sea. we're told the 22-year-old was playing football with friends at roosevelt beach. friends told the coast guard he disappeared after trying to catch a ball in the water. several county agencies are involved in the search right now and the coast guard has called in a helicopter as well. we're headed to the bay right now and we'll bring you the latest on the search as soon as we learn it. >> this afternoon, a father driving with his fall lid emilyp ge
, or defund education, they'll say we don't want to cut the entitlement programs, we want education paid for and so forth and so on and then they vote for the people who want to do the opposite. >> hal: yeah or in the case of rand paul eliminate the department of education. >> yes. i have become kind of the avatar for ashley judd even though i don't think that is accidental or that she wanted me to but people in kentucky tend to vote with people who they feel comfortable comfortable and not necessarily people they agree with. and i think that's why she has such a great chance at beating mitch mcconnell. because people are tired of mitch mcconnell. >> hal: in all fairness mitch mcconnell is not comfortable with mitch mcconnell. >> exactly. >> hal: he never seems to feel comfortable with himself. when nancy pelosi was speaker of the house, there were so many stalled bills that were worthwhile that were not getting through jnow there's the exact opposite. there is a stampede of republican bills that are never going to nakt the senate that are going to make it through.
level so that all children could have a nice education or access to a better education. >> so now what does the state think about all this? well, state board members express strong support and authorize the superintendent and president of schools to draft a formal comment on the waiver. now here is the rub. if the nine districts get approval for their plan, you can look for lots of other districts to line up right behind them. >>> and the u.s. is about to cast a much wider cyber security net with a new plan that will affect many of the country's private sector employees. the white house has signed an executive order expanding a cyber security program that scans internet traffic heading into and out of defense contractors. workers at big banks, utilities and key transportation companies will have their e-mailings and web surfing scanned as a precaution against cyber attackinattac attacks. >>> and compromise and peace, that was the message president obama delivered today on the second day of his middle east trip. more from our world tonight. >>> raj, president obama urged both the israel
the young people here want. they want the ability to make their own decisions and get an education and get a good job and worship god in their own way, to get married, raise family. the same is true of those young palestinians i met with this morning. the same is true for young palestinians who yearn for a better life in gaza. that's where peace begin, not just in the plans of leaders but in the hearts of people. >> this was mr. obama's chance to appeal to a new generation of israelis and to reach out to them in a personal way, something his critics charge he hasn't done before. in many ways it was vintage obama. the world witnessed the return of the hope and change go from 00:2from -- change guy from 2008. >> let me say this as a politician. i can promise you this. political leaders will never take risks if the people do not push them to take some risks. you must create the change that you want to see. ordinary people can accomplish compare things. >> get your cell phones out. i want to know what you think. tonight's question. will the middle east take president obama's message of compro
assistance with basic services including education for syrian children so far from on, whose lives have been up in did. as parents, we can only imagine how heartbreaking that must be for any parent, to see their children having to go through those kinds of tumult they are experiencing. as our partnership improves, the lives of not only the jordanian people, but people across the region. your majesty, i want to express my great appreciation for our partnership. thent to thank you and jordanian people for the hospitality you have shown me, and for my fellow americans. this is my last visit. tom looking forward tomorrow, weather permitting, seeing one of the greats waters of history, that the world can experience thanks to jordan and its people. thank you. >> yes? >> thank you, your majesty. i want to ask you -- how are you going to keep the borders open for the syrian regime? anything could happen at any time. thet the electricity or water? you might find 1000 refugees. that is what you spoke about, your majesty. i want to thank you again, and i just want to know -- you are the leading superpo
to mobilize your membership? when are you going to go after the education communicate, the teachers to come out and make a stand? they're working on that right now. so i think the momentum is not going to die. i think you're going to continue to see efforts to, both on the federal and the state level to take action to promote gun safety measures, things that are wildly popular. even in kentucky, 75% of the citizens say they're for background checks. 65% of kentuckians say they're for registration for guns in the state. so again not all the action has to take place at the federal level. it can happen at the state level as well. >> michael: which is important to remember when you think about that being kentucky the kind of sentiment the kinds of guns people have in this country. before i let you go, it is the anniversary of the iraq war and tell me what president bush's legacy as it pertains to the iraq war. >> well, i was a journalist in 2003 when the iraq war began. i editorialized. i looked at three different occasions we need to be careful about how we go to war. we need to be skeptical o
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